Washington Technology Center Awards $452,285 to Spur Innovation and Jobs

Five company-researcher projects have been awarded state funding for the development of innovative commercial technologies.

SEATTLE — July 8, 2010 — Washington Technology Center has awarded a total of $452,285 in state funding to five researchers working with companies to develop commercially promising technologies. The companies expect commercial adoption of their technologies to create more than 90 new jobs in Washington during the next five years.

The company partners are: Healionics Corporation, of Seattle; Hummingbird Scientific of Lacey; Pico Computing of Seattle; Simulab, of Seattle; and SpringStar of Woodinville. Winning proposals from the University of Washington described innovation in computer systems and microelectronics, advanced materials and manufacturing, and biotechnology and biomedical devices.

“Innovation is the lifeblood of a 21st century economy,” said Washington Governor Chris Gregoire in support of this round of award winners. “I commend these companies and their university partners for developing cutting-edge technologies that will lead to the creation of desirable, high-wage jobs in Washington.”

This round of projects addresses a wide range of innovation:

Healionics Corporation, a startup biomaterials company in Seattle, is partnered with the Department of Medicine at the University of Washington to commercialize UW technology that will reduce infection from skin-breaching devices such as catheters. Healionics expects this technology will enable the company to capture a significant part of a $100-200 million market. In this Phase III project, UW will receive $82,500 in research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center. Read more

Hummingbird Scientific, a developer of electron microscopy products located in Lacey, Washington, is partnered with the University of Washington Department of Mechanical Engineering to develop a system for nanoscale imaging of materials in temperature-controlled fluid environments. Hummingbird Scientific expects their system could prove to be a core technology for a range of scientific advances, from developing efficient solar cells to targeting cancer cells. In this Phase III project, UW will receive $100,000 in research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center. Read more

Pico Computing, a Seattle-based developer of reconfigurable computing hardware and software, is teaming with the University of Washington Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Engineering to evaluate the use of high-performance parallel computing for accelerating genomics processing. Pico Computing plans to commercialize the resulting technology, which will have benefits for basic medical research, human health, and agriculture. University of Washington will receive $100,000 in research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center for this Phase I project. Read more

Simulab Corporation, a Seattle-based developer of medical and surgical simulators, is working with the BioRobotics Laboratory at the University of Washington to commercialize UW software capable of measuring hands-on surgical skills. Simulab plans to target surgical residency programs and large hospitals for the skill-evaluating simulators. In this Phase II project, UW will receive $89,811 in research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center. Read more

SpringStar, Inc., a Woodinville, Washington-based manufacturer and developer of insect pheromone technologies for residential and garden pest control, is partnered with the University of Washington’s College of Engineering and Department of Chemistry to develop a significantly improved mosquito trap. SpringStar aims to produce an efficient trap for use by the U.S. military, mosquito abatement districts and consumers. University of Washington will receive $79,974 in research and technology development funding from Washington Technology Center and $19,860 from SpringStar for this Phase I project. Read more

About the Research & Technology Development (RTD) Grant Program

Washington Technology Center competitively awards applied research funding through the Research & Technology Development Grant Program for technology projects that show strong potential for commercializing products and creating jobs in Washington. Since 1996, this state-funded program has supported 345 research commercialization projects developed between companies and non-profit research institutions. Applications for the next round of funding will be available in January 2011. More information about the research and technology development program is available online at http://www.watechcenter.org/rtd.

About Washington Technology Center

The mission of Washington Technology Center is to assist companies in the creation of innovative products and technologies that provide job opportunities for the citizens of Washington state. Through the Investing in Innovation program, Washington Technology Center provides companies with access to critical resources and support such as state and federal funding. Our 15,000-square-foot Microfabrication Laboratory provides companies and university researchers access to state-of-the-art process tools for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) research and product/process development. The impact of Washington Technology Center’s work has generated more than $600 million in additional investment for Washington companies and researchers. Learn more at http://www.watechcenter.org/ or call 206-685-1920.

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This entry was posted in Energy, Healionics, Hummingbird_Scientific, Life_Sciences, Pico_Computing, RTD, Simulab, Springstar, UW, WTC_News. Bookmark the permalink.

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